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The Discontinuity Guide

Discontinuity guide

Series
No information
Author
Paul Cornell, Martin Day & Keith Topping
Release date
Format
Paperback
Original RRP
No. of pages
Publisher
Virgin Books
Previous book
No information
Next book
No information

In 1995, The Discontinuity Guide was first released by Virgin Books.

1st PaperbackEdit

In 1995, The Discontinuity Guide was released by Virgin Books.

Cover blurb Edit

'Resistance is futile!'

Fluffs, goofs, double entendres, fashion victims, technobabble, dialogue disasters; these are just some of the headings under which every story in the Doctor's twenty-seven-year career is analysed.

Despite its humorous title, The Discontinuity Guide has a serious purpose. Apart from drawing attention to the errors and absurdities that are among the most lovable features of Doctor Who; this reference book provides a complete analysis of the story-by-story creation of the Doctor Who universe.

One sample story, Pyramids of Mars, yields the following gems:

Technobabble: a cytronic particle accelerator, a relative continuum stabiliser, and triophysics.


Dialogue Triumphs: 'I'm a Time Lord... You don't understand the implications. I'm not a human being. I walk in eternity.'


Continuity: the Doctor is about 750 years old at this point, and has apparently aged 300 years since Tomb of the Cybermen. He ages about another 300 years between this story and the seventh Doctor's Time and the Rani.


An absolute must for every Doctor Who fan. Wear your anorak with pride, and keep The Discontinuity Guide in its pocket!

Users who have this in their collection Edit








The Discontinuity Guide

Discontinuity guide 2

Series
No information
Author
Paul Cornell, Martin Day & Keith Topping
Release date
Format
Paperback
Original RRP
No. of pages
Publisher
MonkeyBrain Books
Previous book
No information
Next book
No information


2nd PaperbackEdit

In 2004, The Discontinuity Guide was released by MonkeyBrain Books.

Cover blurb Edit

"'A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds,' said somebody — Ralph Waldo Emerson actually. Packed with goofs, fashion victims and dialogue disasters, The Discontinuity Guide proves that the makers of Doctor Who over the years have been, if nothing else, quite magnificently large-minded." — Terrance Dicks

"The Discontinuity Guide is the most elaborate, thoughtful, smart, and intuitive reconciliation of disparate elements I've ever encountered." — Lou Anders


Indispensable, hysterical and brilliant, The Discontinuity Guide is everything the typical television reference manual or episode guide isn't. As well as being a thorough record of every single plot hole, production goof and dialogue blunder and every fascinating tidbit of Doctor Who history and continuity, The Discontinuity Guide is a brilliant attempt to stitch 26 years of television history into a coherent narrative. Well-thought out and credible explanations are offered for the seemingly irreconcilable or merely obscure bits of the mythos, making this an essential reference for the longtime fan and a hilarious introduction for the new one.

Notes Edit

  • Reprint, with no added or updated content apart from a new introduction by Lou Anders.

Users who have this in their collection Edit

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